Volume 14, Issue 58 (1-2021)                   etiadpajohi 2021, 14(58): 143-170 | Back to browse issues page


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Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Faculty of Humanities and Educational Sciences, Tabriz Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tabriz, Iran
Abstract:   (765 Views)
Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the mediating role of psychological distress in relations of early maladaptive schemas and negative emotion regulation to the tendency to high-risk behaviors (including substance and alcohol use) in students. Method: The present study was descriptive-correlational of structural equation modeling type. The statistical population included all secondary high school students in Miandoab in 2019-2020 (n=4779). A sample of 399 students was selected using Sloven's formula by multi-stage cluster random sampling. Participants completed the early maladaptive schema questionnaire, the cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire, the Iranian adolescents' risk-taking scale, and the psychological distress scale. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation and structural equation modeling. Results: The results showed that early maladaptive schemas and negative emotion regulation had significant direct effects on high-risk behaviors (including substance and alcohol use). Also, early maladaptive schemas and negative emotion regulation had significant indirect effects on high-risk behaviors through psychological distress. Conclusion: In general, the research findings showed that by increasing psychological distress, early maladaptive schemas and negative emotion regulation can cause the emergence and maintenance of the tendency to high-risk behaviors in adolescents, especially substance and alcohol use which are more common in this group.
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Type of Study: Research | Subject: Special
Received: 2020/09/10 | Accepted: 2021/01/29 | Published: 2021/02/11

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